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  • 5 factors for fifteen - A solid grasp of past and present industry trends can help you prepare for challenges ahead. Sedgwick’s thought leaders are helping clients by forecasting five primary factors that will impact our industry this year. Learn more.
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Managing-drug-samples-physician-officeManaging drug samples in a physician’s office or ambulatory care clinic requires a system of checks and balances to help prevent medication errors and adverse drug events, establish a tracking system for alerts and recalls to comply with federal laws and regulations, and to protect from loss of inventory/pilferage. Also, medication dispensing should be held to equivalent standards of care whether done by a provider office or a pharmacy. Some organizations have stopped distributing sample medications in their provider offices to eliminate the need to manage them or to avoid any legal and ethical issues that can arise when free samples are provided by pharmaceutical company representatives. Others have deemed that the economic benefits to patients and the convenience of starting drug therapy at the time of the visit outweigh the time and effort needed to manage the samples and put sample control systems in place.

The patient safety and liability risks of drug samples include:

  • Improper labeling
  • Medication errors
  • Incomplete patient monitoring
  • Lack of appropriate tracking
  • Inattention to expiration dates
  • Theft

While handling of pharmaceutical samples by physician offices is largely unregulated, state medical practice acts generally allow physicians and certain other providers with prescribing authority to dispense drugs from their offices. However, from a risk management and patient safety perspective, physician offices that dispense samples need to be sure that patient education is provided and that samples are kept secure from patients and staff who are not authorized to prescribe and dispense them. This is an often-neglected function that Sedgwick consultants find when assessing office practices. Frequently, safeguards are not in place and there is a lack of understanding of safe drug sample management.

Sedgwick’s Drug Sample Management Guidance Toolkit offers recommended practices and action steps; see excerpt below.

Sedgwick_PL_Drug-Sample-Management-Guidance-Toolkit

Sample medications can be important to many patients when managing their health. Whether due to financial issues, limited access to a medication while waiting for a prescription renewal or for the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of a newly prescribed medication, many physicians feel strongly about providing sample medications to their patients. When managed as outlined above, the handling and distribution of sample medications can be a win-win for patients and providers.

For more information about the Drug Sample Management Guidance Toolkit, contact HealthcareRM@sedgwick.com.

Kathy Shostek, RN, ARM, FASHRM, CPHRM, CPPS, Vice President, Health Care Risk Management

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california-IMRRecently there has been a lot of discussion – in the media and throughout the industry – about the California independent medical review (IMR) process. Introduced to the workers’ compensation system in California as part of Senate Bill 863, IMR serves as a way to fortify utilization review (UR) decisions and reduce frictional allocated loss adjustment costs. A similar process has been used for more a decade in the group health arena. IMR offers the injured worker a sole remedy for contesting a UR denial. A physician, rather than an administrative law judge, evaluates medical guidelines to determine if the UR was conducted properly.

Since the injured worker can request IMR for each UR denial, the demand proved to be greater than what the state of California originally anticipated. Since its inception in July 2013, more than 315,000 IMR requests have been made for all dates of loss industry-wide. Sedgwick receives approximately 2,000 IMR requests each month from injured workers. Maximus, the contractor for the state of California, has been working to keep up with the demand. Early in the process, they were completely overwhelmed and as a result IMRs took longer than the 30-day turnaround time required in the statute. Maximus has recently ramped up its operations and asserts that it can keep up with the heavy demand.

Across our industry, most IMR determinations currently uphold the original UR denials; this is in stark contrast to the days before the inception of IMR, when most UR denials contested by injured workers were ultimately overturned by judges or agreed/qualified medical evaluators through an often prolonged, expensive and litigious process. In large part thanks to IMR, employers and carriers can successfully uphold the denial of inappropriate medical care. The largest piece of the IMR pie – nearly 45% – relates to decisions about medications. About 86% of IMR decisions uphold the original UR determinations.

A number of plaintiff attorneys in California are attempting to discredit IMR as unconstitutional on the grounds that it removes the judicial branch from the process. They argue that UR and IMR serve to deny necessary care to injured employees. Recent studies show that more than 94% of requested medical treatments requested in California are approved; only 5.9% of requests become eligible for the IMR process.

Sedgwick has prepared a resource document outlining the IMR process and including statistics regarding the demand for and results of IMR. If you have questions or comments, please feel free to post them here or contact me.

Eddy Canavan, VP, Workers’ Compensation Practice & Compliance

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computer-security+healthData security, or cyber security, is and has been on everyone’s minds now for some time. The hits just keep coming even as organizations step up their efforts to keep data protected. In the area of healthcare, it is especially true that you would want to keep personal health records protected and out of the “bad guys’” hands.

You may think you have taken the steps needed to protect your company’s data. Let’s ask some questions and let your answers guide you to your own conclusion. How does your data security currently stack up?

1) Do you think your annual SAS 70/SOC1 is the best tool to audit data protection compliance? No, that standard is too low.

Your Statement of Controls (SOC – the audit that replaced the earlier SAS 70) attests primarily to workflow associated with financial impacts. While some data protection controls are covered in the SOC1, they are woefully insufficient to assure your board, your management or your clients that your data protection practice has been objectively reviewed. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 27001 certification is the gold standard for international-caliber data protection. SOC2 and SOC3 attestations are a step in the right direction, but the ISO 27001 is more mature and accepted internationally.

Does your firm certify to the ISO 27001:2013 standard? Do your vendors?

2) Do you think antivirus software is the best protection against malware? No, that standard is too low.

Today’s malicious software differs radically from viruses from just a few years ago. Traditional antivirus software can only protect against things it has previously seen; new malware is specifically designed to constantly change itself to bypass traditional antivirus software. Application whitelisting software is quickly replacing antivirus software on workstations and servers of the best data protection organizations.

Does your firm use application whitelisting software on every workstation? Do your vendors?

3) Do you think your security policies will protect you? No, that standard is too low.

Security policies focus on administrative controls – things your employees are supposed to do but may not actually be doing. Technical controls (i.e. computer-enforced) are critical to align and enforce what you intend to happen. Policies can guide your technical controls, but they aren’t sufficient and offer little real protection.

Does your compliance and security team emphasize technical controls over administrative controls and policies? Do your vendors?

4) Do you think penetration testing is the best way to double check your internet-facing software so it can’t be hacked? No, that standard is too low.

Your software – any software – has errors and flaws deep within the programming code just waiting to eat you alive. These flaws don’t show up with standard testing. Tools like binary code testers analyze the logic and software vulnerabilities for ALL of the programming in your code, not just the code that’s operating when regular testing occurs.

Does your company use binary source code review software? Do your vendors?

5) And last but not least, do you think HIPAA is the data protection standard to meet? I think you know the answer! No, that standard is too low.

HIPAA requirements tend to pick and choose what to protect and often require only relatively loose technical protections. Healthcare data security should behave more like large financial institutions, creating multiple layers of security around everything and following rigorous frameworks designed to protect both transactions and data at rest. Shoot for data protection compliance comparable to big banks in your systems; you’ll not only meet HIPAA requirements, you’ll dramatically reduce your risk of data breach.

Does your company align to the financial industry’s standards for data storage, transmission and destruction? Do your vendors?

Do you get the idea by now? Say it with me…if you think your standard protections are enough, no that standard is too low! I may sound like a broken record, but in all seriousness (and this is a very serious issue) you must be vigilant; when you think you have done all you can do, dig deeper and find out how you can do more to protect your data and your employees’ or clients’ data.

I would be interested to hear your thoughts, concerns or suggestions on other ways companies can work to protect their data. Let’s start a dialogue; share your perspective in the comments.

Robert Jackson, SVP, Information Security Officer

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On Wednesday at the RIMS annual conference in New Orleans, I’ll be moderating and contributing to an important session with Gert Cruywagen, a leading risk leader from a South African hotel and casino enterprise and Betty Simkin, a leading finance and risk professor from Oklahoma State University who recently co-authored a significant text on case studies in successful “progressive” risk management. The session will highlight stories reflecting alternate versions of risk management maturity and success in the discipline.

strategic-risk-pyramid

I use the term “progressive” because whether you practice “enterprise risk,” “strategic risk” or “integrated risk,” it is my view that it all boils back to what “risk management” should have always been. In other words, while so much of the history of the discipline has revolved around the insurance mechanism as the primary, often exclusive, source of risk “treatment,” the most significant results achieved by risk leaders have more often been outside this box and involved risks (often strategic and operational) that do not lend themselves to insurance treatment. Aside from this fact, using the insurance/self-insurance mechanisms and strategies remains a very important tool in the arsenal of leading, accomplished risk professionals.

This session will begin with a review of a brief state of the union of risk management around the world. We will highlight, among other things, the RIMS’ risk maturity model that was so thoughtfully developed several years ago by a group of risk leaders with their own success stories, and who thoroughly vetted the seven components of “risk maturity” that they believe are most impactful in producing meaningful results for companies. Consider employing many – or even all – of these techniques to influence your own risk management program’s results. These techniques include:

  • A truly enterprise-wide approach to risk management
  • Use of repeatable and scalable processes
  • Use of a risk appetite framework and/or strategy
  • Use of root cause analysis
  • Attention to emerging risks and exposures
  • Use of a risk-performance approach
  • Emphasis on building and sustaining a resilient enterprise

Of course, there are many sources for defining risk maturity, each of which has its own take on this question; that diversity is what makes the discipline so vibrant and dynamic. As I like to say, there is no single approach that leads to great results. With that in mind, we’ll also be talking about the prevailing opinions and concerns of senior leaders and boards of directors, as shown in recent research, with respect to what they look for in risk management functions and leaders, and where the current opportunities lie in their organizations; we’ll look at what these stakeholders have to say about successful, mature and results-oriented risk management. While most stakeholders take a more narrow view of this question tied to their area of expertise and focus, the success of all risk management functions is highly dependent on a strategy that engages and leverages the views and talents of key risk stakeholders throughout an organization when developing and deploying a risk strategy and the many tactics that bring that strategy to life.

So while risk maturity implies success, not everyone can claim a successful experience. We’ll delve into areas that represent the pitfalls to be avoided in pursuing risk management excellence, enabling attendees to learn from the mistakes of others – mine included. You may have a “mature” risk program that succeeds more slowly over time, rather than producing the marquee results that matter most to many organizations. Any strategy deployed for any length of time will have its share of accomplishments, but “success” is really in the eyes of the beholder. To that point, understanding who your stakeholders and key constituents are is critical to true successful maturity, a term that we’ll put definition to and help refine. We’ll clarify what success looks like by exploring a set of elements which mean the most to the typical key risk stakeholder community. Here’s a peek at the elements I think are most impactful and important to senior leaders and boards:

  • Process consistency
  • Process rigor
  • Semantic interpretability
  • Communication clarity
  • Balanced measurability
  • Downside protection as job 1
  • Value creation
  • Embedded risk culture
  • Managing to appetite parameters
  • Aligning, if not integrating with, strategy and objectives

Of course as all risk leaders know, the discipline is daily faced with challenges and opportunities. In fact, most challenges are opportunities to be accepted if not exploited. We’ll spend some time addressing both. Attendees will leave with a clearer sense of not only what risk management success really should mean, but how several successful organizations have, in their own unique ways, achieved a level of successful maturity that works for them. And if no other point lands on solid ground with attendees at this session, it is that there is no one right way; if you don’t build your risk strategy and framework around the priorities of your organization, you’ve likely missed the boat.

Hope to see you at our session on Wednesday from 11:30-12:30, room 222 in the convention center.

Chris Mandel, SVP, Strategic Solutions

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Emerging-RiskWe are in a time unlike any other in our industry. The pace and the reach of emerging risks make our heads spin. Each day the news brings new reports on topics that we know will impact the businesses we are all looking to protect. This year at RIMS 2015, I am co-presenting on the topic of emerging risks. The goal of the session and this blog is to help you understand how some of these emerging risk areas could affect your business.

Healthcare
The Affordable Care Act continues to challenge the market. How will you achieve the perfect balance between cost and quality care? Rising medical costs are fueled by the role inflation may play. The aging workforce will certainly impact medical costs now and into the future. The same injuries today will cost more to treat older employees. Physician access may become an even greater concern in the future as companies try to work with the doctors who provide the best care.

Medical marijuana
Last year, Sedgwick published a couple of very widely read blogs about medical marijuana. The legal landscape may be changing, but the medical facts still show that there are many risks associated with marijuana use including doubling risk of drivers, impairing coordination and inhibiting problem-solving, just to name a few.

The impact of opioids
We know the danger and risks, but do you know the costs associated with opioids? Claims with long-acting opioids prescribed are 3.94 times more likely to be a $100,000 claim per Accident Fund Holdings report.

Diversity in the workforce
If you compare today’s labor force to past decades, you’ll find it is older, more racially and ethnically diverse and composed more of women. The most telling number is that by 2050 there will be no racial or ethnic majority among the general population of the United States according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Predictive modeling
How do we make sense of all this? The most talked about solution for understanding complex risk issues is the use of predictive modeling. Predictive modeling is not taking the magic eight ball and asking it for answers. It requires a great deal of expertise and knowledge to begin to harness the power of the data in your hands. You must have a plan and realistic expectations and, most importantly, know that there is no quick fix. Predictive modeling takes work and is an ongoing process. It is an exciting new frontier and one that continues to expand in potential solutions.

These are just some of the topics we are talking about at RIMS 2015. If you feel overwhelmed reading this list, the good news is Sedgwick has experienced colleagues in all these areas to assist you and help you deal with emerging risks. What emerging risks most concern you? Please leave your thoughts here on the blog or find one of our team at RIMS 2015 and we will answer your questions.

Read more: 5 factors for fifteen – Sedgwick predicts key trends we believe will most significantly affect our clients and the industry throughout 2015

Jim Ryan, EVP, Casualty Operations

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RIMS-coverSocial media and risk managers are still not words often heard together. As I prepared for my Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) 2015 session entitled, “Watch this: Social media’s impact on claims strategies,” I became increasingly aware of the impact social media can have in our industry. I sought to understand why social media is important in risk management and, in particular, how it can enhance the customer experience.

At Sedgwick, we play an active role in social media and believe that being part of the online conversation is important to not only improve the consumer (claimant) experience, but also to enhance our brand reputation and that of the clients we represent. Working with our social media team, I have become a believer in the power and potential social platforms can play in the risk management/insurance industry.

We live in a hyper-connected world where we hold amazing amounts of data and the ability to connect in real time in the palms of our hands. As consumers ourselves, you have to admit you are probably becoming increasingly impatient when you don’t receive customer service in minutes using a mobile device. The same is true in our industry; the world never sleeps and no matter where you operate someone is looking to connect with you about a claim or other risk-related matter.

I only have to give you a few facts to emphasize that social media is king. The Pew Research Center reported in a study released on January 15, 2015 the following demographics of social platform users:

  1. 71% of online adults use Facebook
  2. Usage among those age 65 and above rose from 45% to 56% since 2013
  3. The fastest-growing platform is Instagram, seeing almost every demographic grow; most notably, usage by 53% of young adults 18-29 is up from 37% in 2013

In my session, we are covering the typical aspects of how you can use social forensics to track those who are committing fraud. This in itself is fascinating as we see that people can’t help but share information about themselves. This includes incriminating evidence trails left on social sites. There is still much to learn about what and when this type of social forensics can be used.

Infographic-Social-RIMS15-2

Proactive customer experience
What I really want to talk about, however, is promoting a proactive customer experience. There is so much opportunity to preemptively prevent a claimant from becoming angry or frustrated. I believe one of the main reasons claims go into litigation is poor communication. Social media is the new age of communication and it is imperative we all join in. The fact is the conversation is happening in the social space – with or without you.

I know you are saying, “but Scott, we are not a B2C company where the general public would complain if they didn’t get their food order or products delivered correctly.” My answer is, you are still in the customer service business. In today’s fast-paced world, consumers of both products and services want to know that the companies they rely on will respond on social media in as little as 30 minutes. Today when a consumer is not happy, what do they do? They often turn to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or another social channel to vent their unhappiness. By responding and seeking to take the conversation offline in pursuit of resolution, you succeed in letting that consumer know you are listening.  In many cases at Sedgwick, we find that is a huge step in diffusing frustration.

Brand reputation management
The next reason to engage through social media is your company’s brand reputation. When you can address negative comments and not allow those to grow, you are protecting your brand. Again you might be saying to yourself, “Scott, we work in risk management – not marketing or social media.” I say, then you need to start finding out if your company has a team of people who are already listening or monitoring your brand and what is being said about your company. If they are not, then there are some inexpensive methods (including dashboard tools, like Hootsuite, Buffer or Sprout Social, or search tools, like Google Alerts) that you can use to at least listen to what is being said about you. If possible, respond and react in real time or partner with your social media or marketing team to be notified in a timely manner about negative comments online.

The truth is that even major brands are still adapting to living in a hyper-connected world. So although the risk and insurance industry as a general rule has been behind, we are all catching up quickly. I encourage you to start with small steps and explore ways you can become more proactive in your social customer experience.

Please feel free to leave your thoughts and comments here. Better yet, let me practice what I preach and follow me or Sedgwick on Twitter and ask your questions there. I can be found @sprogers68 or @Sedgwick. I look forward to proactively discussing this topic with you.

Scott Rogers, EVP, Casualty Operations

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Changing-workforceWe’ve been actively preparing for a great RIMS 2015! I’m excited to be speaking to the conference with one of our client partners on the changing needs of the workforce. We have had a great time preparing for our session, Faces in the crowd: Meeting the needs of an increasingly diverse workforce, scheduled for Tuesday morning.

I spend a lot of time working with our colleagues and listening to their perspectives as they navigate their work day. A few key things are changing for our organization, and I’m sure others, as we try to create a supported and engaged workforce.

  • Technology: it rules the world! Our workforce is getting younger and they are used to getting everything right here and right now. Employers, including Sedgwick, have had to adapt our pace and forms of communication to allow us to meet their needs for here and now information.
  • Time: It used to be seen as a badge of honor to work well into the night and on the weekends. No more! Our evolved culture wants to work hard, but also have the opportunity for flexibility and time in their life for what’s important to them – outside of their careers. We understand that appropriately managing flexibility will create a more engaged workforce. I write all of the time about how my mom is living down the street from our office in a nursing home. The ability to run and help her with lunch makes me a better colleague when I return to the office. The same holds true in maintaining balance for colleagues who want to make sure they are there for important events in their kids’ lives or who have hobbies that require them to leave on time. Balance makes a better workforce.
  • Information: There is so much access to information now that it’s hard to know how and when it starts and stops. Our workforce demands information on a 24/7 basis. In order to meet their changing needs, information has to come in a variety of formats and be easy (and quick) to read and digest. Twitter allows for a lot of this and we use this routinely to communicate what’s new and next.
  • Opportunity: Raising three older teenagers, I can personally attest to the fact that the millennials want and expect opportunity. Employers handle this in a variety of ways, but the most important part is to pay attention to it as a need and address it. At Sedgwick, we encourage experiential learning and are supportive of colleagues who want to get exposure to more so that they can do more. Paying attention to and encouraging horizontal growth keeps a diverse and inclusive workforce well-educated and will make our business stronger.

We are looking forward to seeing everyone in New Orleans. I’m personally looking forward to talking about how we create a workforce for the future that gets us all where we want to go.

Kathy Tazic, Managing Director Client Services, National Accounts

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Communities and companies alike are on a mission to create a culture of health. Obesity, chronic disease and diabetes management have long been a wellness focus for employers. 25 years ago, the Americans with Disabilities Act was passed and its intent, along with other programs designed to help employees with disabilities, illnesses or injuries, was to create a more engaged workforce through better work solutions and accommodations. Resulting programs have had questionable impact on production and return on investment. Now, health reform is creating a need for employees and patients to become health consumers. The intersection of these programs, and others similar, along with the desire to maintain an engaged workforce, are fueling a desire and business need to create a culture of health within the workplace.

A culture of health can foster both mental and physical well-being and corresponding healthy decisions throughout an organization. It has long been documented that a healthy corporate culture leads to employee retention and satisfiaction, and quality products. A culture of health supports a healthy culture by shifting the focus to health of employees, business units and the company. Today’s organizations have a diverse population of employees with widely varying levels of health needs. A culture of health is designed to encourage and foster each individual leading a healthier life.

Culture-of-health-infographic

From a community or population health perspective, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) is leading efforts to make a culture of health a national priority. The health of our nation will not improve based solely on employer solutions and I applaud the RWJF and their efforts and reach. I encourage you to check out rwjf.org to learn more about their culture of health community initiatives. RWJF acknowledges there is no single definition of a culture of health; it is as multifaceted as the population it serves.

As employees become actively engaged in their health, productivity and financial performance improves. NextHealth co-founder, Ray Fabius, MD, is a world-renowned global physician executive and population health expert. In Dr. Fabius’ latest book Population Health, he writes, “When legislators and politicians speak about ‘bending the healthcare cost curve’ those that have built ‘cultures of health and wellness’ have done it.” Employers with successful culture of health programs understand that the culture of a company and the health of its workers impacts all employees from the manufacturing floor to client-facing colleagues, supervisors, leadership and includes the C-suite. A culture of health is one which encourages healthy decisions at work and at home, for the employee and their family.


Some organizations, like Johnson & Johnson, have created a sustainable culture of health that has proven successful and the benefits are well-documented. Check out their website to learn more about the J&J culture of health program.


How does an employer go about creating a culture of health? Buy-in from human resources, risk management, leadership and key stakeholders throughout the organization is a must; make this a company initiative and, equally important, a corporate value. Cultures do not change overnight and evolve over time, so plan accordingly.

Define your benchmarks to assess success and communicate expectations broadly and repeatedly. You may want to consider having health goals as a performance metric or business unit objective. The action plan and strategy to implement and grow the culture of health should be thoughtful and approached in such a way that all colleagues feel included and will participate. Finally, companies should consider and track how their financial performance is impacted post-implementation of a culture of health. Considerations for tracking financial performance may include productivity, absence, health costs, revenue and EBITDA. As documented by HealthNext, companies focused on a culture of health outperform those without a corporate strategic health program.

Risk managers should be as engaged in creating a culture of health as health benefits, wellness, disability and leave of absence managers. The organizational impact to productivity, workers’ compensation and risk portfolios is meaningful.

I encourage you to join the dialogue about population health and creating a culture of health. Follow the conversation with Sedgwick as we explore this topic from the #RIMS2015 conference this week at our annual healthcare breakfast where we will ask the experts, “What’s your methodology for creating a culture of health?”

I look forward to providing insights and ideas gathered from this session through future blog posts and Sedgwick’s new quarterly publication, the edge.

Kimberly George, SVP, Corporate Development, M&A, and Healthcare

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RIMS-2015-scienceI always look forward to the annual Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) conference. For me, it is a time to reconnect with our great clients, stakeholders and friends. It is also an exciting time to forge new partnerships, and of course hear some of the most insightful people in the industry speak at the many educational sessions.

This year, I am also looking forward to sharing our theme “The science of innovative solutions,” and all that it means for our clients and the industry at large. I invite you to get a head start and visit our RIMS website rims.sedgwick.com. We have a wealth of information already available for you to read and watch. You can also request a meeting with our colleagues who are joining me at the conference.

I want to announce another Sedgwick innovation that I believe will be a significant RIMS-2015-edgenew resource for you. I am proud to introduce the edge, a quarterly publication dedicated to shining a light on our industry’s leading-edge topics that shape our collective future. Our thought leaders have written exceptional articles in this inaugural edition; I encourage you to read and share. Once again, Sedgwick is a catalyst for change.

Another exciting opportunity at RIMS is our sponsorship of the Spencer 5K Fun Run. You can still register and help support industry education. As a Spencer Educational Foundation board member, I can say firsthand that this is a great organization we should all support. This is the first year for the 5K Fun Run and I expect it to grow each year.

Finally, the learning opportunities at RIMS are always exceptional. Sedgwick has ten sessions planned with each providing a fusion of knowledge and expertise from our thought leaders and partners. Experience the energy of Sedgwick’s thought leadership by attending these sessions. To learn more, visit our educational sessions page at rims.sedgwick.com.

I also invite you to stop by Sedgwick’s booth (1621) or VeriClaim’s booth (1913) in the exhibit hall to spark a conversation during the conference. Explore our expert resources, innovative technology and powerful solutions. Find us on the exhibit hall map.

I look forward to seeing you at RIMS in New Orleans and wish you safe travels.

Dave North, President and CEO

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St-Jude-Voice-in-the-CommunityAt Sedgwick, our approach to community involvement has always been to support our colleagues in supporting causes about which they are passionate and that reflect the needs of the local areas in which we operate. This week marked the culmination of two important community service projects undertaken by our colleagues.

Sedgwick embarked last fall on an exciting companywide community engagement effort called Voice in the Community. We partnered with a cause-based clothing company and purchased custom-designed Voice in the Community t-shirts. Our 12,000 colleagues had the opportunity to buy a shirt, and each colleague got to choose where to direct the money from their purchase: to their office activity committee to support local community service projects, or to one of three national charities. Additionally, for each Voice in the Community t-shirt sold, our vendor donated a school uniform shirt to a student in an under-resourced area.

In total, our generous colleagues raised almost $44,000! Thanks to the efforts of our activity committees, more than $9,500 was distributed to non-profits throughout the U.S. We also raised nearly $6,000 for Feeding America, more than $6,200 for Toys for Tots and nearly $22,000 for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. With 100% of funds collected through the t-shirt sales going directly to charity, this initiative has truly been a win-win.

Building on the momentum of our Voice in the Community initiative, in December we held our 2014 holiday card campaign, which was devoted to brightening the lives of the brave children of St. Jude. We invited our colleagues, clients, vendors and friends to “embrace their inner child” and share photos reflecting the joys of childhood and the holiday season. Sedgwick committed to making a donation to St. Jude, up to $50,000, for each photo uploaded. We received nearly 250 photos and more than 1,750 views of our submission page and smile gallery. Our #sedgwicksmiles4stjude campaign helped to raise awareness about the life-saving work of St. Jude and brought smiles to the faces of all who participated.

St. Jude - Sedgwick check presentation

Dave North & Sedgwick MVPs present a check for over $70K to St. Jude from our #sedgwicksmiles4stjude & Voice in the Community campaigns

This week, we had the unique opportunity to visit St. Jude – located not far from our corporate headquarters in Memphis, Tenn. – and present a check to the hospital for more than $70,000. That donation includes Sedgwick’s holiday campaign gift and the monies raised by our colleagues through Voice in the Community. Our Most Valued Performer honorees joined members of our executive team at St. Jude for the check presentation, a tour of the magnificent campus and packing food bags for the families of children being treated there. It means so much to us to be part of St. Jude’s groundbreaking work to eradicate childhood cancers and other life-threatening diseases.

Sedgwick MVPs volunteer at St. Jude

Sedgwick MVPs volunteer at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Our generous colleagues and committed clients, vendors and friends have helped us ensure that Sedgwick’s voice in the community remains loud and strong. Let us know what your organization is doing to promote community involvement.

Terri Browne, Chief People Officer